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20130416
20130416
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
obama was sworn in for the first time in 2009. dan bonngeno was the lead secret service agent as people packed the national mall in downtown d.c. a potential terrorist could have been hiding in plain sight. >> you can't guarantee anything. you reduce the probability to hopefully something minuscule so if something happens your response is enough to keep casualties to a minimum n times square 2010. a car bomb failed to explode and was disarmed before it could hurt anyone. two days later a pakistani-american was caught trying to board a flight to the middle east. big sporting events like the boston marathon had been viewed as inviting targets since 9/11. the marine corps marathon attracts 30,000 runners each year. super bowl organize ohhers are often criticized for too much security at the big game. and securing every possible public event that could invite an attack is respond reasonable. michaelle leiter was the counter terrorism director under president george w. bush. >> you can't protect all of the people at all of the large sporting events or any public gathering. that's the advanta
last night. and new york city and washington, d.c. are on heightened alert. the secret service shutting down pennsylvania avenue out of an abundance of caution. last night, president obama addressed the country, stopping short of calling the blast terrorism. and asking for the prayers of the nation. >> the american people will say a prayer for boston tonight. and michelle and i said our deepest thoughts and prayers to the families and the victims in the wake of this sense tense loss. bost season a tough and resilient town. so are its people. i'm confident that bostonians will pull together, and move forward as one proud city. as they do, the american people will be with them every single step of the way. >> the bombing brought back painful memories for boston. after all, one of the planes took off from logan airport on september 11th, nearly 12 years ago. michael leiter is an nbc news national security analyst. he's the former director of the national counterterrorism center in washington. michael, thanks for joining us. where i'm sitting is about four blocks from the crime scene. but o
? >>. >> shep: the president is headed to boston. white house says he will speak at an interfaith service dedicated to the victims of the boston bombing. earlier today mr. obama said the american people refuse to be terrorized and praised the actions. >> exhausted runners that kept running to the nearest hospital to give blood and those that stayed to attend to the wounded. first responders who ran into the chaos to save lives, if you want to know who we are, what america is, how we respond to evil, that is it. selfishly, compassionately and unafraid. >> shep: governments around the world are increasing security at public places and landmarks, but there are some major events on the horizon including 30 different marathons. greatest challenge may be in london. tomorrow hundreds of diplomats and dignitaries are expected the funeral of margaret thatcher. on sunday, half a million spectators are expected to line the streets of london for that city's marathon. fox report jonathan hunt live with us. it appears that the london marathon is going to be a a tribute to the victims here in boston? >>
to the middle east. this man's job when he was at the secret service -- protect president obama with 1.8 million people on the washington mall gathered for his first inauguration. >> you can't guarantee anything. all you do in the field of security is reduce the probe ability of an event like this to something so miniscule if something does happen your response element afterward is enough to keep the casualties to a minimum. >> many americans have grown tired of war, tsa checkpoints and heavy security at sporting events. former national director of counterterrorism says the threat remains very real. >> if this turns out to be either domestic or international terrorism it will remind people of the difficulty of the tasks that we have been working against over the past ten years. >> reporter: experts say that while we can certainly prevent and address more security issues than we did before 9/11, trying to protect a soft target like a marathon is just increasingly difficult and they point out that a terrorist only has to find the weakest, softest point and attack there. of course that's where we'r
's what we all want to moment dan was a u.s. secret service agent who walked ahead of president obama during "the nine" inaugural parade and he knows what it takes to secure this type of situation. dan, that's what people want to know. how? how could this happen? >> good question. i think everybody is assuming, though, that these bombs were planted yesterday when they, in fact exploded and the event happened. that may not be the case. i don't know that for a fact, but what concerned the secret service and me specifically when i was there and we would organize the parade route for the president was not a device trying to come in that day. we knew we would be able to intercept it, but a device that was preplanted. and that, unfortunately, may be an avenue they may have to pursue investigatively. >> brian: from what you can tell, from what we know, this saudi national is a person of interest in the hospital right now who we've gone through his apartment. how unusual is it for the bomber, who is not a homicide bomber, to be a victim? evidently he had burns on him and smelled like gun powd
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)